Say Hello, Leave a Comment!

I can see in my blog statistics that a lot of interesting searches regarding cameras, photography, and humanitarian photography lead people to my blog.  But I don’t get a lot of comments yet so I don’t know how well I’m solving people’s problems, answering their questions, and entertaining them.

So let me know what you think!  Leave a comment, let me know what you like, what is helpful, and what you would like to see.  Thanks in advance for the feedback!


Cynthia Paniagua performs Despierta Peru – 2009-09-16


Cynthia Paniagua performs Despierta Peru – 2009-09-16

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  1. Hello!

    I love following your blog. I have been doing a lot of research into humanitarian photography lately, because it is something that I am leaning toward for my future. I will be attending school in the fall for photography, and so far in my research of humanitarian photographers, you have been the most helpful to me! I like how real you are and the variety of things you share, I really appreciate it. So thank you, and I will continue to follow your work and use your blog as a resource!

    Kerry

    1. Thanks for reading and for letting me know that I have been helpful! Be sure to also check out Karl Grobl’s website and David duChemin’s blog for good info on working as a humanitarian photographer. And I recently came across this book by Thatcher Cook which looks to be informative for working in the field:
      http://www.pictographers.org/wordpress/publications/

    2. Hey Doug,

      I recently discovered your blog and I have really enjoyed it. I do have an interest in humanitarian photography–partly through a love of photography and a love of travel, but also because of the impact it has on all of us, whether we recognize it or not. My son was adopted from Vietnam–a beautiful country with the friendliest people I have ever met (and I have traveled quite a bit) and Vietnam is an example of humanitarian photography at it’s best. I love that photographers are able to draw attention to the plight of those who don’t enjoy the very things we take for granted–clean water, access to medical care, etc.

      As a single parent I don’t see a time in the near future where I will be able pursue this as a career, but I do hope that once my son is a bit older we will be able to travel together and I can teach him about giving back. After visiting the orphanages and seeing how these children don’t have access to the advanced services that they need (physical & occupational therapy, schooling), I can no longer turn a blind eye and pretend the need does not exist.

      Erica

      1. Erica, thanks for the feedback and comments. Vietnam and SE Asia is one of the trips I’ve been trying to take for awhile now, and I hope I can get there someday soon.

        I like you comment about no longer being able to turn a blind eye to the needs out there. It is a mental transition I think about a lot – a blessing and a challenge that will never disappear once you’ve seen and experienced a wider world.

        Wonderful photos on your blog!

      2. Hey Mr. K – here’s yet another comment about comments — just keep writing and sharing all this good info! And participate in other like minded circles, as I’m sure you already do. Nice photos of that Cynthia dancer, someone to watch!

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