Humanitarian Photography

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One of my favorite Friday reads is the 10Q Interviews with Humanitarian Photographers on Heber Vega’s blog.  As suggested by the title, he interviews a different humanitarian, travel, or culture photographer each week, asking them a similar series of questions and sharing several of their photos.  I was fortunate to be interviewed by him a […]

If you happen to receive the Humane Society’s All Animals magazine, be sure to check out the section on young animal activists.  Last month I was fortunate to meet and photograph an amazing and motivated young animal activist, Ayna Agarwal (and her dogs).  One of my portraits of her and Muffy illustrates her profile in […]

This is part two of an ongoing series. Over the last several months I’ve collected some of the search terms that led people to read my blog. I’m presenting several of them here, along with brief but informative answers. This is part 2 of this series. The next ones in the series include questions on […]

This post is the first in an occasional series in which I will describe the making of a photograph, from both a technical and artistic standpoint. I’ll go through the camera settings and why they were chosen, as well as the thought processes going through my head regarding composition and the creation of the image. […]

Today is World Humanitarian Day 2010.  Help celebrate the efforts and accomplishments of humanitarian aid workers worldwide.

I wrote a popular previous post about How to Start Out as a Humanitarian Photographer. It discusses one of the important initial steps of this endeavor: the Self-Assignment. The self-assignment – a volunteer trip to work with and photograph an NGO or non-profit – should help you determine if humanitarian or travel photography is something […]

I’d like to welcome the new readers that are finding me after reading my interview with Heber Vega in the “10Q – Interviews with Humanitarian Photographers” section of his blog.  Please have a look around, including the posts in my Humanitarian Photography category.  Some of them I referred to in the interview, including my post […]

Two years ago, in 2008, I ventured to the annual rebuilding of the last remaining traditional Inca rope bridge, the Keshwa Chaca, which spans the Apurimac River near Huinchiri, Peru.  My mission was to photograph the locals as they spun q’olla grass into rope, constructed the bridge, and celebrated the completion with a festival of […]

I’ve been intending to write a post about Nicholas Kristof’s wonderful book Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide, and how it should be required reading for humanitarian photographers. I haven’t gotten around to that yet…but I have set up an Amazon collection of required reading for humanitarians – please take a […]

One woman, somewhere in the world, dies each minute from complications of pregnancy or childbirth. Half a million women a year. Learning that fact compelled Christy Turlington to do something about it, and one of the things she has done is to make a documentary about the issue, “No Woman, No Cry.” I was fortunate […]

When I began my work in travel, culture, and humanitarian photography I spent a great deal of time scouring websites, reading forums, checking reviews, making lists, and agonizing before I finally settled on which lenses were best for my needs and my work. So hopefully all my effort can help you save some time and […]

Here is another one of those articles, this one in the New York Times, chronicling the decline of opportunities for professional photographers.  It is frustrating and discouraging to keep reading this news and these types of predictions.  But there are always going to be those who are determined to follow their passion and figure out […]

Yesterday was World Water Day, an annual event which calls attention to the issues surrounding, you guessed it, water!  Some of these issues include water quality, access to clean water, water shortages, and water management.  This year’s theme was “Clean Water for a Healthy World.”  As with many global struggles, it is the poor who […]

In 2007, legendary war photographer James Nachtwey won the TED prize in honor of his life’s work documenting conflicts and social issues around the globe. In addition to awarding him $100,000, the prize also allowed him to make a wish that the TED fellows would assist him in fulfilling. His wish was to photograph an […]

There are many grim, depressing, disturbing, and disheartening photos of the aftermath of the earthquake in Haiti, such as this series on The Big Picture.  But today I came across a series of photos that show a different side of the conditions in Haiti.  Photographer Alice Smeets had taken revealing photos of the lives of […]

I’ve recently discovered the excellent book Blue Planet Run, which I came across after seeing photographer Rick Smolan’s TED lecture.  He’s the guy behind the “Day in the Life” series of photo books that were so ubiquitous awhile ago.  Anyway, Blue Planet Run is a book he created, full of amazing photos, statistics, and essays […]

(For related posts, check out other entries in the Humanitarian Photography category.) The National Press Photographers Association (NPPA), “a professional society that promotes the highest standards in visual journalism,” has a code of ethics that all members are required to endorse. Whether or not you are a member, I think that they are excellent guidelines […]

(For related posts, check out other entries in the Humanitarian Photography category.) In my previous post about starting out as a humanitarian photographer, I discussed how to go about creating, planning, and executing your own self-assignments, in order to gain experience in the field and begin to develop a portfolio of work. In this post […]

Check out LensFlare35.com for a great interview and narrated slideshow with humanitarian photographer Karl Grobl.  He discusses how he started out, his experiences traveling and working in developing countries, and the stories behind some of his favorite photos. Sorry, the webpage with the interview seems to be gone.  Here are some other interviews with Karl: […]

(For related posts, check out other entries in the Humanitarian Photography category.) As one grows up in the first world, they learn to see the developing world as exotic lands of vibrant color and fantastic ceremonies.  I recall that for a grade school project I made a large cut-out of the African continent, and populated […]

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